A Pandemic Series – My Red Lipstick

A Reposting of the Three Red Lipstick Poems, in Sequence

These three poem-videos belong in this sequence, not in the reverse order in which the blog displays them below, based on when I initially posted them.

1

My red lipstick is annoyed,
muttering behind my mask,
wanting an escape.

2

My red lipstick explains
shyly,
she is not annoyed;
she is afraid.

Afraid I will permanently abandon
her, and my rings,
and the new dress fluttering on its hanger. 

Now –
and for all the roiling days 
masked in the fog
of an un-normal future.

3

My Red Lipstick Mourns

My red lipstick mourns,
huddled in her drawer, 
as I mourn, too,
bare-lipped behind my mask.

Now – I groom for “meetings”,
my red lipstick appears,
digitally
trying to represent who I was.

I yearn for, mourn for,
the times I touched, hugged,
and groomed for,
locked away now,

My Red Lipstick Mourns

My Red Lipstick Mourns

My red lipstick mourns,
huddled in her drawer, 
as I mourn, too,
bare-lipped behind my mask.

Now – I groom for “meetings”,
my red lipstick appears,
digitally
trying to represent who I was.

I yearn for, mourn for,
the times I touched, hugged,
and groomed for,
locked away now,

like my red lipstick.

Teaching in the 21st Century

Here’s why I love the web.

I found the video embedded below on Twitter, with a mention in the post of Ignatia, a woman whose knowledge and sharing I have respected for years  – http://ignatiawebs.blogspot.com/2010/04/meaningful-and-powerful-learning-how-to.html.
I think the video is beautifully designed and presented, and it’s what I believe about teaching for today.
I hope you enjoy the 10 minutes it takes to watch it, I hope it gives you ideas and enthusiasm, and I hope you spread it.
Joan Vinall-Cox, PhD – joan.vinallcox@gmail.com
JNthWEB Consulting – http://www.jnthweb.ca/
Social Media & Learning
https://joanvinallcox.wordpress.com/my-e-portfolio/

Posted via email from joanvinallcox’s posterous

From Knowledgable to Knowledge-able by Wesch

Academic Commons
Academic Commons

Michael Wesch is a pedagogical hero of mine. I’ve watched videos his classes made; I’ve watched a video of him explaining his teaching, and I asked a question on Twitter, and even though he doesn’t follow me, got an anwser from him within a few hours! He understands the impact of the new communication ecosphere we swim in, applies his understanding to his teaching, and can explain clearly why this is urgently central to education.

Here is a link to my highlighted copy of his recent Academic Commons article – From Knowledgable to Knowledge-able which I discovered via Stephen Downes. Indeed, as Wesch says, you set up your network and information comes to you.

Higher Education’s Survival

Sometimes you find someone saying what you have been thinking about. I think the future of higher education is in danger, and I would hate to see the loss of something so precious. Through Stephen Downes wonderful newsletter, OLDaily, which can be linked to here – http://www.downes.ca/, I found David Wiley’s 2008 ELearn presentation – http://opencontent.org/blog/archives/660 – which I’m embedding below. Serious food for thought


Teaching Communication Now!

As a longtime communications teacher, I am fascinated by our changing communications media and platform. And when I’m teaching, no matter the direct subject I’m teaching, I never lose awareness of the changes our culture is going through, and the responsibility of teachers to help prepare our students for this new and rapidly evolving communications environment. They will be swimming in it for the rest of their professional and personal lives.

What is often unnoticed is that in just over a century we have gone from having one way of recording, putting marks on paper, to multiple ways of recording, all more viscerally immediate than text. Photographs, recorded sound, moving pictures all speak more directly to our senses and emotions than squiggles on paper – which our minds must translate into meaning before we can have our sense and emotional responses. It is easier to think critically when text is what we are ‘reading’ than it is when we see and hear less mediated (so to speak) representations of the world we live in. We are now living in what Ong called “secondary orality” and that is what our students have been growing up in, and to a certain extent, what we grew up in too.

I have never known a world without photographs, radio and records, movies and television. However, text was still the dominant medium, at least in my educational experiences, for most of my early schooling, and mass media ruled. I looked, listened and watched, but I could only critique; I couldn’t participate.

Now I can sit in my study and produce multimedia, as in this blog post.

Vodpod videos no longer available.

The audio is poor, but understandable, and I’m combining text with video. I can embed other sites, like what I thought about this new multimedia platform that we can access using computers –

and I can link to other sites for readers/viewers who want to explore more of the educational possibilities – http://jnthweb.pbwiki.com/

and I can make movies using my screen –
Vodpod videos no longer available.
more about “Generating a Table of Figures in Word…”, posted with vodpod

There are other tools that I can use to create a mixed media text, and, here is the point I want to make:

We need to be teaching our students (technical and non-technical) how to compose using the expanding possibilities of the web as a multimedia, participatory communication platform!

Twitter – a Brief Intro

I’ve been ‘playing’ on Twitter for a few months now. I choose who I follow based on whether we appear to have similar interests, and I let anyone who wants to follow me. There are people who I follow who don’t follow me, and people who follow me who I don’t follow back. It makes for a kind of discontinuous ‘conversation’, and you might wonder why I bother. Here are some reasons:

  • it can be interesting seeing what people are doing/thinking in different parts of the world;
  • I find links to sites about things that interest me, mostly about the impact of social media on education and small businesses;
  • I find blogs I want to add to my RSS reader;
  • reading Tweets can take the boredom out of waiting.

If you’ve heard the buzz about Twitter but don’t ‘get’ it, here are two resources that might help you start, but you have to play on Twitter for at least a month to find out how you might want to use it, and if it’s useful for you.

CommonCraft’s Twitter in Plain English by Lee LeFever

Biz Stone’s How Do You Use Twitter, on Vimeo

http://vimeo.com/1466612

The discipline of only having 140 character spaces helps you practice alternative phrasing, brevity, and, possibly, texting spellings. The availablity of Twitter on mobile devices allows you to do silly things like watch political debates while reading Tweets and writing them while the debate (or game or show) is still going on.

Personally I use a variety of Twitter applications:

  • On my laptop
    • http://twitter.com/home – the home site
    • http://www.tweetdeck.com/beta/ – which allows me to see any Replys or Direct Messages even if I’ve missed them when they first showed up on Twitter
    • There are many, many Twitter applications – use Google if you want to try some of the others.
  • On my iPhone
    • Twitterific – which is free from the App Store
    • Summizer – $2.99 from the App Store and allows you to search for topics and/or follow hashtags (Look it up;-> I had to).

So give Twitter a try, but do watch out; it can become addictive;->